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20100901
20100930
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KPIX (CBS) 19
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a second language. jennifer mistrot shows us a new program in fremont that's getting kindergarteners speaking mandarin. [ mandarin ] >>> reporter: this is the second day of miss wang's kindergarten class. the kids are jazzed. they are learning the world's most spoken language. it's the first year of the fremont school district's mandarin immersion program. >> in a nutshell, they are going to learn the culture. they are going to learn the language. and they are going to be educated in all the same standards. >> reporter: same course work any other california kindergartener gets except they will spend 90% of their classroom time counting, singing and speaking chinese. these mini language wizards are chosen by lottery and come from classes throughout the district. the goal is to create bilingual citizens. >> we're mexican and italian and just very mixed american family so as far as her knowing mandarin or knowing chinese culture i thought that was something else just to expose her two. >> reporter: most of the kids have at least one chinese parent but english is still the first language
it. you have a 50/50 chance of being infected. jennifer isn't worried. so it wouldn't stop you? >> no. it wouldn't stop me, no. unless i had a big huge thing in my arm then i would stop. >> reporter: it's the only place in california where the japanese bubble snail is found. if you got the rash while swimming at crown beach, there is not a lot you can do about it. but wait a few days and it will be gone. at crown beach, don ford, cbs 5. >>> a new approach to helping struggling home owners, that's in two minutes. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, the agency is one of three in th s trying out >>> caltrain is experimenting with a new plan to cut down on suicides. the agency is one of three in the country trying out these new signs. they are on a 10-mile stretch between menlo park and mountain view. the difference with these signs is that the phone numbers do not spell out the words like help or suicide. >> it isn't necessarily easy to find the word help on a cell phone when it hasn't got the letters ton. >> the number and type of calls will be tracked. this will be the first time in the united st
and plantains. jennifer mistrot tonight on how those merchants say this is all just part of doing business. >> reporter: california is known as land of the fruits and the nuts. we love our produce. we just forget to pay for it sometimes. >> mango or banana. [ speaking spanish ] >> all the different fruits out here people just take them. they steal them. >> reporter: food stands like lucky pork market are the colorful backbone of the mission. they are tempting to thieves. >> i don't know how he grabs the watermelons but he steals it. >> reporter: he tells me he frequently sees people steal fruit from his produce stand. he says the total dollar amount exceeds about $20 a day. >> i mean, i won't do it personally. i think i'm honest. >> reporter: shop owners say most of their customers are honest. still, some merchants do install mirrors and other devices to curb the theft. still, there are times they admit that they do just simply look the other way. >> they're hungry and then the only people who is going to do it is the people who probably need it. >> reporter: and that's why for the most pa
, not require surgery. our dr. jennifer ashton will explain why the new procedures could make something like liposuction, for instance, obsolete. >> do crunches, i think. >> i think so. >>> first dramatic and emotional testimony in a connecticut courtroom as a doctor described how his wife and two daughters were murdered. cbs news correspondent betty nguyen is at the courthouse in new haven, connecticut with this story. betty, good morning. >> the prosecution's key witness, the lone survivor of the brutal crime, took the stand yesterday and in front of a captivated courtroom, he described what happened. it's the moment the community has waited more than three years to hear. the doctor william petit took the stand tuesday to testify against the man accused of killing his wife and daughters. petit told a hushed courtroom how two men force the their way into his home and tortured his wife, jennifer, and their daughters, hail yedz, 17 and mckay la, 11. a horrific ordeal describing bei being waken with a baseball bat and describing what they said. petit also told a jury how he was tied to a post
home owners jittery about some potential scams. jennifer mistrot about how neighbors can make sure that contractors spotted in the area are supposed to be there. >>> reporter: the residents of this san bruno neighborhood evacuated after last week's gas explosion are back in their homes. they have been greeted by signs, warning about contractor fraud. >> you know, when they first approached me, i was a little leary because they were anxious to get in and started cleaning. >> reporter: he lives near the blast site. he thinks his house sustained minimal damage. but inside reeks of smoke so everything needs to be washed from the walls right down to the dishes in his kitchen cupboard. it's a big job. >> i'm sort of consistently asking the policemen, hey, what are the rules and regulations of letting people in? because they are not letting a lot of people in. so since these restoration and cleaning folks have been let in, does that mean they're on the up and up? >> i was in the neighborhood today and -- >> reporter: pg&e wants to make sure all contractors working to restore this neighbor
images of jennifer hawk pettitte alive. this newly-released video ticks off the final moments of a horrific crime. pettitte withdraws $15,000, nervously explaining that she and her family being held hostage and the money is a ransom. the manager called 911. >> we have a lady in the bank right now who says that her husband and children are being held at their house. she is petrie if ied. all right pettitte got the money and left the bank at 9:22. >> they told us they wouldn't hurt anybody if she got back there with the money. she believes them. >> reporter: at 9:26, police in unmarked cars to the pettitte house. officers are told to block off the street. almost 30 minutes later, 9:54, a badly injured william pettitte escapes to a neighbor's house and a second 911 call is made. >> i got bill pettitte here who's hurt, my neighbor. >> he's at your house? >> yes. he is right here. >> reporter: the suspects allegedly set the house on fire and attempt to flee in the pettitte's car. police tried to block the driveway causing the two vehicles to collide. the officers approached the car
the intruders took jennifer to a bank and forced her to withdraw thousands from her account. a bank teller called police but by the time they arrived, the two children and mother were dead. house burned to the ground. they tried to escape but crashed into a barricade. william petit, who barely made it alive, suffered severe injuries. at a memorial service days later, he spoke about the tragedy. >> i guess if there's anything to be gained from the senseless deaths of my beautiful family, it's for us to all go forward. >> reporter: over the last three years he has launched a craw sad to have both men convicted and executed for their crimes. fighting proposed bills to ban the death penalty in connecticut. dr. petit, the survivor, made his plea very public and the governor reportedly decided not to sign the bill because of this case. >> reporter: this this morning, charged with capital murder, kidnapping, sexual assault, burglary and arson, 47-year-old steven hayes will finally face justice. both accused killers will be tried separately and dr. petit is expected to testify against both of them
dr. jennifer hartstein she's a child and adolescent psychologist. >> good morning. >> 400% increase in the last 10 years. why do you think it's been so dramatic? >> it's an incredibly huge increase. i think there's ease of use. >> easy access like the girl said. >> it's in your house, your medicine cabinet. you don't have to seek it out. you can hide it more. the signs aren't there, so the parents can know what you're doing. >> what's also scary, kids are younger and younger. kids as young as 12 years old doing that. >> 12 and older. >> if your kid smokes you can smell the smoke. if your kid drinks you can see they are drunk. if they abuse prescription drugs, how can you tell? >> it's harder. talking about feeling hot, maybe they are nauseous eyes are red, nose running, lethargic, trouble in school. some of the signs are the same. it's much harder to look for. you have to look in your cabinets and see what's going on. >> not just cabinets. aren't there other hot spots. >> medicine cabinet. kitchen, households appliances. garages, they are using inhalan
that the younger you are, the easier it is to learn a language. jennifer mistrot shows us a program of kindergarteners speaking>>> reporter: this is the second day of miss wang's kindergarten class. the kids are jazzed. mandarin. jennifer mistrot shows us a program of kindergarten speaking mandarin. >>> reporter: this is the second day of miss wang's kindergarten class. the kids are jazzed. they are learning the world's most spoken language. it's the first year of the fremont school district's mandarin immersion program. >> in a nutshell, they are going to learn the culture. they are going to learn the language. and they are going to be educated in all the same standards. >> reporter: same course work any other california kindergartener gets except they will spend 90% of their classroom time counting, singing and speaking chinese. these mini language wizards are chosen by lottery and come from classes throughout the district. the goal is to create bilingual citizens. >> we're mexican and italian and just very mixed american family so as far as her knowing mandarin or knowing chinese
fashion in our next hour so stay tuned. jennifer hudson here. before weight watchers, my world was can't. but now. lose weight. can. live. can. stand here and not suck' in a thing... i can. and you can too. [ female announcer ] hurry. join now and get a month free. weight watchers. because it works. as they do at the beginning ? only air optix® contact lens materials have tricomfort™ technology. they let up to five times more oxygen through the lens than traditional soft contact lenses... ...are designed to retain moisture for comfort all day long... and have superior deposit resistance for cleaner lenses. air optix®, the lens you can survive a long day in. go to airoptix.com for a free one-month trial offer. air optix®, the lens you can survive a long day in. c berkeley alumna >>> it is 7:55. time for news headlines from cbs 5. i'm sydnie kohara. >>> a uc-berkeley grad has been released from custody after more than a year in an iranian prison. iran's state news agency says sarah shourd will travel to the nearby country of oman, where her mother is already waiting for her. it's no
't do it again. >> early show contributor, jennifer hartstein, a child and adolescent psychologist. good morning. >> good morning. >> is there a single most important thing to keep in mind when you're trying to discipline a child? >> you want to make sure that the punishment fits the crime. discipline is really different than punishment. you want to be able to teach while you're also setting limits. that's a really important component. you want to know your kid. know what's going to work and know what's meaningful and put it into play. >> know that a lesson is being learned as opposed to here is this punitive thing. >> punishment doesn't teach anything new. it tells people what to be afraid of. maybe they will be more secretive, hide out a little more. it's important in discipline to say this is the consequence, this is what you did. what can you do next time. >> absolutely an equation. can you apply that equation to a toddler? >> yes, absolutely. you can start -- and you have to start early. it's really important to start as young as you can letting your kids know what your expectations
in your kids' teeth. is there nothing you don't have to worry about these days? dr. jennifer ashton is here to tell us what we need to know, what to do about it this morning. we'll take care of those fears. first, we want to get to this incredible story of bravery. this past sunday a man's car burst into flames in northwest georgia. dan gloth would have died if not for some dedicated police officers. we're going to speak exclusively with dan and two heroes who saved him this morning. first, jeff glor with more on the story of that rescue. jeff? >> erica, those police officers are being called heroes this morning. when you see the video, you will see why. the dash cam video says 5:11 a.m. moments before sheriff's deputy chad phillips arrived at the scene of a horrifying accident. >> when i first arrived the flames were probably six, seven foot high. >> reporter: 56-year-old dan gloth was trapped inside his burning car. worried he'd never see his daughters again. his car filled with black smoke, making it impossible to see or breathe. he couldn't kick out the windows. what gloth didn'
, what do you think is the answer for dealing with distracted driving? jennifer says... "ther 't >> send your answers to mornings@cbs5.com. or you can post your answers on our facebook page. we're also on twitter. we'll share your responses. >>> overpaid and in jail. the new obstacle for city leaders in bell. >>> plus, it's three -- [overlapping speakers] >> and another morning that killers here at san quentin have the opportunity to be alive. we'll tell you the latest in the legal wrangling that is keeping albert brown alive this morning. coming up. >> all right. thanks, anne. plus, it's 3-d and no glasses are required. whether nintendo's new gaming device will be out in time for christmas. >>> love super mario brothers. all right. chp work it would go pretty big accidents right now in the east bay including one where traffic is backed up close to half a mile. we'll tell you where that is coming up. ,, ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] it's a universal gesture... ♪ a way of telling the world "you did it!"... without saying a word. introducing the mercedes-benz sls...amg. [ engine revs ] ♪
the musical now the film with jennifer hudson. how does this compare with those. pretty much the same because the film was -- it's about the songs, it's about the stars. it's a full on in your face stage show. it is playing for a limited run in san francisco. so this is the one to go to at the theater this weekend. >> last but by no means least my friends i want to tell you about the two festivals. first the millbrae art and wine festival saturday and sunday. lots of music, arguments, the beer tent, john. there will be the beer tent. >> they have art there? >> music, art, the beer tent! >> and wine, look at that. and then the other big steps, sausalito this weekend -- >> that's right. they have a big festival. >> one of the biggest art festivals in the country. >> starship played there. >> what are you doing this weekend? i will be at the sausalito art festival. i'm thinking about all the art. but the full list will be on cbs5.com. >> thank you. >>> all right. warm weather back in the bay area. people visiting the beaches and the parks. >> so our question of the day to you, what is your fav
they are in custody. their next court date is september 23. in san bruno, jennifer mistrot, cbs 5. >>> those devastated by the explosion are now sifting through the burned-out rubble. their homes, their treasured keepsakes, wiped out in a tragic instant. but while there is little left to salvage, anne makovec shows us from these ashes hope emerges. >> reporter: it's not worth saving but we did anyway. >>> reporter: the only decipherable items left over from their three-bedroom home now fit in this box. >> like there are baseball cards in here and so i don't know why we took this. but we did. or an old yearbook, something like that. >> reporter: one week after the gas explosion decimated their neighborhood, the family suited up in hazmat gear to sift through the rubble that was once their home on glenview drive. >> it's like --it's kind of like going to, i don't know, a cemetery. just everything was dead, you know? no life left to it. >> reporter: what was that life, -- what was that like, the digging through rubble? >> it kind of felt like, you know, i don't know, like you weren't going to a
gates joins us now along with dr. jennifer ashton. good morning. >> hi. >> as i became aware of this story, i knew that you were going to come in to chat with us, i'm going to ask questions that may sound dumb. do you remember being here last summer? >> yes, yeah. >> i'm curious. you are a person we can have a real conversation about, about having a stroke and the effects of that. >> yeah. >> did you come to after you were hospitalized, your brain is working? >> when i first got into the car with my girlfriends, they asked me to write the alphabet. i could only get up to the letter "l." then i don't remember anything after that. and when my doctor -- the doctor you saw, i was in the hospital, and he was asking me to touch my ear and my nose. i couldn't do it. >> you didn't know what they were. remarkable that you have to literally rebuild your brain basically from scratch. >> it was fascinating process. >> that's an interesting way of putting it. was it arduous? >> yes. it was hard. it was hard. >> even now, though, do you -- are you symptom-free? or are there longer lasting
of foodborne disease we see every year. jennifer ashton is here with more. disgust. one out of seven kitchens wouldn't pass the test. that was conservative, they said. it is probably worse in reality. >> precisely why i stay out of my own kitchen. but in actuality, erica, there are number of foodborne illnesses every year, resulting in 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 estimated deaths due to foodborne illness. this is not an insignificant issue. >> it is ear just. actually a number of them also go unreported. numbers could be potentially higher. >> absolute. >> i what is it? where's the germiest, grimeiest, most bacteria laden spots in the kitchen we need to clean up? >> anywhere that you put your hands from the second you walk in your kitchen. remember, you can potentially bring germs into your kitchen before you start cutting. anywhere from the faucet and sink to the refrigerator and to the stove handles and everywhere. but these are really the biggest hotspots and start really with what we use to clean our kitchen which is are sponge. >> can i just say this is a plea to everyone, don't u
. jennifer ashton is here to explain. this has been the driving force for so long. it's always there, the low carb diet, you lose weight, but with it, all these health problems. >> some real risks. and as you mentioned, it's not just low carb, but it's high protein, high fat, which is instead of the carbs that are so harmful. but this diet is actually harmful, as well. they followed about 130,000 people and actually found that those on the low carbohydrate high fat, high protein diet, especially high animal fat and animal protein, actually had a freig greater risk of death and cancers and heart experts have been saying this for years, there is a healthier way to go where you can still dou low car, but substitute a lot of plant based. >> so if you feel it works for you, what are we talking about specifically? is it tofu and avocadoses? >> the key to any successful diet is anyone can lose weight over any period of time, but you need to maintain it. and it needs to be relate abiliable and work for your lifestyle. good sources of protein like tofu, almonds are good.able and work for your lifestyl
john gilbride and our other own dr. jennifer ashton. good to see both of you. >> good morning. >> what is it about this and why is the dea doing it now. >> well, when you look at the numbers, it's staggering in terms of the number of people that are abusing prescription drugs. seven million people abuse prescription drugs a 13% increase in just one year. when you look at the number of teenagers that are abusing prescription drugs, it's frightening. 2500 teens, on average, every day use prescription drugs to get high for the very first time. so, operation takeback is a chance to get those drugs out of the medicine cabinet where they're just sitting there waiting to be abused. >> jen, as a doctor, how rampant is the abuse that you see in your own office and what is the seriousness of it? because i think a lot of people miss that point this all of this. >> well, i think we don't really know how rampant it is. those numbers we just saw are just really estimates and the fear in medicine, clinical medicine, this key even be worse. i think a lot of people fall in the habit of use, abuse and d
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19